tcoterie:

Roots ,Handmade ceiling light made of pewter wires by FMFOS

tcoterie:

Roots ,Handmade ceiling light made of pewter wires by FMFOS

(via enchantedmystery)

amber-skies-with-dragons:

Uruguay Amethyst in agate. 

(via gemstonejunkie)

virtual-artifacts:

Helmet in the form of a sea conch shell, 1618 (17th century), Japan.  Iron with traces of lacquer, textiles, 9 inches high by 10½ inches.  Created by artist Nagasone Tojiro Mitsumasa,

virtual-artifacts:

Helmet in the form of a sea conch shell, 1618 (17th century), Japan.  Iron with traces of lacquer, textiles, 9 inches high by 10½ inches.  Created by artist Nagasone Tojiro Mitsumasa,

(via japaneseaesthetics)

indietrove:

RockHoundSoap

buginmyeye:

Don’t have business cards

couldn’t find the wax seal I made with my initials

so I made a stamp instead. And I quite like it!

Scrambling to get things done and presentable for the weekend, and also settling on prices .___.

Everything looks awesome!

(Source: spoopybuginmyeye)

buginmyeye:

Don’t have business cards

couldn’t find the wax seal I made with my initials

so I made a stamp instead. And I quite like it!

Scrambling to get things done and presentable for the weekend, and also settling on prices .___.

Everything looks awesome!!

(Source: spoopybuginmyeye)

I entered this Copper Oak Leaf Necklace in a contest at my local rock and bead shop today.  The stone is from them- it’s Picasso Jasper, and I’m really in love with it!  I made a little acorn toggle too.  It’ll be for sale in my shop when the contest is over.  

I have my eye on some beautiful stone cabs from them, so I’m keeping my fingers crossed that I win a gift certificate!

Enjoy Free US shipping through Saturday the 28th with coupon code: USFREESHIPPINGNo matter where you live, any order over $100 will ship free with the code: OVER100- Lithic Design

Enjoy Free US shipping through Saturday the 28th with coupon code: USFREESHIPPING

No matter where you live, any order over $100 will ship free with the code: OVER100

- Lithic Design

cross-connect:

Danny J Sanchez   Photomicrography

Photography through the microscope - inclusions within gemstones!

I am a native Los Angelino who loves gems and what’s happening inside them.
From the first time I looked through the microscope, into the heart of a gemstone, I was absolutely hooked and after I opened the Photoatlas of Inclusions in Gemstones by Eduard Gübelin and John Koivula, I knew what I wanted to do with every moment of my free time.
I can be found on…
Instagram: @mineralien
Twitter: @innermineralien
Tumblr: mineralien.tumblr.com

At the center of most of Sanchez’s pictures are the random bits of minerals stuck in a larger gem as it forms–what are called inclusions. To collectors, they’re imperfections that reduce the value of the stone–to Sanchez, they are things of beauty.Top two images are Negative Crystals, empty spaces in the shape of crystals !

1.Negative crystal in spinel
Vietnam
Field of view = 2.9mm • Depth of field = 0.85mm
It’s not uncommon for spinel to form negative crystals within, but this is one of the most shockingly perfect negative crystals I have come across. The way the light races across its terminations and ghosts the inner cavity with a confusion of color makes this negative space one of the most exciting pieces in my collection.

                                                     &&

(Source: crossconnectmag, via bogglocity)

ancientart:

A stag-shaped Parthian drinking horn. 1 of about 4 similar horns currently on view at the Getty, I believe. 
Made of silver, gold, glass, and garnet, this stunning drinking vessel dates from 50 BC- AD 50.

The forepart of a stag emerges from the curving body of this gilt silver rhyton. The stag is very naturalistic and highly detailed, down to the rendering of veins in the snout. The wide inlaid eyes and the outstretched legs heighten the realism as the stag seemingly bolts in flight. The term rhyton comes from the Greek verb meaning “to run through,” and depictions of rhyta on Greek vases show that they were used to aerate wine. Wine poured into the top of the vessel came out of a spout between the animal’s legs. The spout on this example is now missing, but the hole remains visible.
Stylistic features suggest that this rhyton was made in northwest Iran in the period from 50 B.C. to A.D. 50. This region had been part of the Achaemenid Persian Empire until Alexander the Great’s conquest. After his death in 323 B.C., the Hellenistic Greek Seleucid dynasty, whose kingdom stretched from Turkey to Afghanistan, ruled this area. As Seleucid authority began to weaken In the later 200s B.C., a group of semi-nomadic people called the Parthians, from the steppes of south central Asia, challenged the dynasty and by the mid-100s B.C. had firm control of this area of Iran. This complicated political history left its legacy in the art of the area. Rhyta of this form had a long history in earlier art of Iran, but the floral motifs were drawn from Seleucid art. (getty)

Courtesy of & currently located at The J. Paul Getty Museum, Villa Collection, Malibu, California. Via their online collections: 86.AM.753.

ancientart:

A stag-shaped Parthian drinking horn. 1 of about 4 similar horns currently on view at the Getty, I believe. 

Made of silver, gold, glass, and garnet, this stunning drinking vessel dates from 50 BC- AD 50.

The forepart of a stag emerges from the curving body of this gilt silver rhyton. The stag is very naturalistic and highly detailed, down to the rendering of veins in the snout. The wide inlaid eyes and the outstretched legs heighten the realism as the stag seemingly bolts in flight. The term rhyton comes from the Greek verb meaning “to run through,” and depictions of rhyta on Greek vases show that they were used to aerate wine. Wine poured into the top of the vessel came out of a spout between the animal’s legs. The spout on this example is now missing, but the hole remains visible.

Stylistic features suggest that this rhyton was made in northwest Iran in the period from 50 B.C. to A.D. 50. This region had been part of the Achaemenid Persian Empire until Alexander the Great’s conquest. After his death in 323 B.C., the Hellenistic Greek Seleucid dynasty, whose kingdom stretched from Turkey to Afghanistan, ruled this area. As Seleucid authority began to weaken In the later 200s B.C., a group of semi-nomadic people called the Parthians, from the steppes of south central Asia, challenged the dynasty and by the mid-100s B.C. had firm control of this area of Iran. This complicated political history left its legacy in the art of the area. Rhyta of this form had a long history in earlier art of Iran, but the floral motifs were drawn from Seleucid art. (getty)

Courtesy of & currently located at The J. Paul Getty Museum, Villa Collection, Malibu, California. Via their online collections86.AM.753.

mineralists:

Quartz with Hematite

mineralists:

Quartz with Hematite

(Source: danweinrich.com, via ancientwoodlands)

desimonewayland:

Pair of spoons for leaf tea
Japan, 1895
Paris, musée d’Orsay

desimonewayland:

Pair of spoons for leaf tea

Japan, 1895

Paris, musée d’Orsay

(via tea-for-tea)

moremetalwelding:

Today’s Honeybee

moremetalwelding:

Today’s Honeybee

(via fabschool)

lithicdesign:

Woah-  300 followers! Thanks everyone!  

* loses a follower * hahahaha

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Picture Stone Boulder Opal - Australia

(Source: opalauctions.com)